We who preach and write, do so in a manner different from which the Scriptures have been written. We write while we make progress. We learn something new every day. We speak as we still knock for understanding...If anyone criticizes me when I have said what is right, he does me an injustice. But I would be more angry with the one who praises me and takes what I have written for Gospel truth than I would be with the one who criticizes me unfairly. -Augustine


Divorce for the Children’s Sake part 4

From the responses I received on “Divorce: For the Children’s Sake,” I realized I needed to clarify a few things. First, these articles are intended primarily for couples who have not experienced divorce, in hopes that they never will. Secondly, these articles/broadcasts are taken from the book, A Case for Marriage, by Linda Waite and Maggie Gallagher. My purpose is to introduce to my readers literature that describes reliable, excellent research from which they can learn and be challenged. Information and understanding is critical before we make decisions that will have lifetime consequences. I do realize that some of you have experienced divorce. Some have experienced relationships in which your spouse has been living a lie; some have experienced incestuous violations involving your children; some have lived in fearful endangerment. The nightmarish and hellish situations that some of you have experienced cannot even be described with words. But one thing is certain, we have a God who can heal the brokenhearted and set the captive free. So please understand that I am not trying to think of myself more highly than I ought. I am thirty years married, but only by the grace of God. Yet I believe that the circumstance and painful experiences we have encountered are for our good—yes, even the worse kind, because they train us in holiness (Heb 12). I am reminded of the account of a beautiful model in London who had a bright future ahead of her. One day, while walking to work, an unknown assailant, for no apparent reason, threw a cup of sulfuric acid into her face. The flesh from her face and scalp were literally burned away. She is now completely disfigured. This was indeed a hellish experience. Her perpetrator was never found or punished for his grievous crime. And yet this awful, tragic experience changed her for the good, as she shared a few weeks ago. God specializes in taking what was meant for evil and turning it into good. He did so with Joseph of the Old Testament who was enslaved and put into prison for many years. The end result was that it brought redemption to his family. Can we learn from our unjust experiences to help bring redemption to others, particularly those we love? Or will we become bitter, bringing those we love further down the path of strife, resentment, and vengeance? In Psalm 119 David wrote, “If your Word had not been my delight, I would have perished in my affliction.” This, my friend, is my hope for you. Our relationship with Christ, and the knowledge of His word and His promises, will determine how we come out on the other side. Bitterness will destroy us. Forgiveness and hope, even in the worst situations, will redeem us. God will never leave us nor forsake us. He knows what is necessary for us to change. Sometimes we cannot see what it is within us that needs change, and sometimes it takes the hard things of life to accomplish a work that could not be performed any other way. In his book, Let Go, Fenelon wrote, “The Great Physician, who sees in you what you cannot see, knows exactly where to place the knife. He cuts swift and deep into your innermost being, exposing you for whom you really are; but pain is only felt where there is life, and where there is life is just the place where death is needed most. Except a corn of wheat fall into the ground and die, it abides alone. But if it dies, it brings forth much fruit.”

Published in: on January 30, 2010 at 6:52 pm  Leave a Comment