We who preach and write, do so in a manner different from which the Scriptures have been written. We write while we make progress. We learn something new every day. We speak as we still knock for understanding...If anyone criticizes me when I have said what is right, he does me an injustice. But I would be more angry with the one who praises me and takes what I have written for Gospel truth than I would be with the one who criticizes me unfairly. -Augustine


Training in Wisdom

Recently we discussed the necessity of raising children who pursue excellence in their area of their giftedness. As parents and teachers we need to provide a broad spectrum of activities and choices in order to narrow the preferred “skill” that a young person needs to develop.

I once hired a young man who was basically self-taught. Although his English and spelling needed improvement, his mastery skill of working with the computer enabled him to be a successful employee. He acquired skills that made his services in demand by several companies in our area. He developed our web site, worked with the design and layout of our catalogs, newsletters, and brochures, and occasionally accompanied me to conferences. In exchange for his time and talents, I paid him well, provided him with state-of-the-art computer technology and opportunities to advance his skills. There was an investment on my part and an investment on his, and the trade-off was worth it for us both.

As I write this, I am reminded of king Solomon’s insights when he said: “Prepare thy work without, and make it fit for thyself in the field; and afterwards build thine house.” We have too many young people who are trying to build their house before plowing their fields. There are fields of opportunities waiting to be plowed. On a Literal level, plowing infuses the soil with oxygen, mixing nutrients, which stimulates growth. Figuratively, when our children start plowing the fields of career opportunities through their studies and work experiences, they will soon see the seeds of their sowing break forth into a fruitful life.

The following link provides excellent insight on how to prepare your children for life, not just college: http://the99percent.com/articles/6932/experience-trumps-theory-reviving-the-apprenticeship-model.

Published in: on October 28, 2010 at 10:23 pm  Leave a Comment  

Blocked Vision, Part 3

Balaam part 3

Numbers 22; 2nd Peter; Jude

We talked yesterday how Balaam the prophet was told by God to go to Moab, but after he went God was angry. At first glance it would appear that God is guilty of double-mindedness. But knowing that God is true and every man a liar, taking a closer look would be the better part of wisdom. Note God’s specific words to Balaam, as well as Balaam’s response:

“And God came unto Balaam at night, and said unto him, If the men come to call you, rise up, and go with them; but only the word which I shall say to you, shall you do.

And Balaam rose up in the morning, and saddled his donkey, and went with the princes of Moab.

And God’s anger was kindled because he went: and the angel of the LORD stood in the way for an adversary against him. Now he was riding upon his donkey, and his two servants were with him.”

Do you see the infractions?

1. He rose in the morning without being called by the men.

2. He saddled his donkey without being told by God.

3. He took servants with him, without instruction from God.

Balaam is revealing his greedy nature by his actions. He’s in it only for the money, thus the reason for the saddled donkey and the servants-he’s planning on making a haul!

In 2 Peter we read that, “some have forsaken the right way, and are gone astray, following the way of Balaam, who loved the wages of unrighteousness…”

In Jude we read: “Woe unto them! for they have gone in the way of Cain, and ran greedily after the error of Balaam for reward.”

If Balaam had looked a few chapters into the future, he would seen one of the greatest warnings in all of the Bible: “Be sure, your sins will find you out” (Numbers 32).

Published in: on October 28, 2010 at 10:12 pm  Leave a Comment