We who preach and write, do so in a manner different from which the Scriptures have been written. We write while we make progress. We learn something new every day. We speak as we still knock for understanding...If anyone criticizes me when I have said what is right, he does me an injustice. But I would be more angry with the one who praises me and takes what I have written for Gospel truth than I would be with the one who criticizes me unfairly. -Augustine


Bewitched

Did you ever watch the television series Bewitched back in the 60’s? There was Samantha with her powerful twitching–but charming–nose, Darren the bumbling husband, and Endora, the mother-in-law who would have loved to turn her son-in-law into a toad. I loved watching this program as a child. It was very ‘innocent’ and if there was ever a program where witches could be viewed as beautiful and charming, it was found in this humorous series .

I know . . . some of you can’t believe what you are reading. You’re right. And as a child, I was unable to discern what I was watching. This series–produced for family enjoyment–was an area where Satan was at work. He even placed his stamp of mockery on the Christian community as they sat in their homes enjoying what appeared on the outside to be innocent fun.

The stamp? The name of the mother-in-law: Endora. The writer and producer of Bewitched knew exactly what they were conveying. The word Endora comes from the book of I Samuel 28, where Saul disobediently consults with the witch of Endor.
God made it clear that witches were an abomination. In fact, in Exodus 22, we read ”
You shall not permit a sorceress to live.” Witches were not to be found among the children of Israel. Three thousand years later, they were brought into our homes and written into our books as God’s children began to enjoy them.

Our culture is saturated with powerful Endoras and beautiful Samanthas that disable our powers of discernment. Why? Like Saul, we fail to know God’s Word and warnings. In Hebrews 5 we read: “But solid food is for the mature, for those who have their powers of discernment trained by constant practice to distinguish good from evil.”